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Yes, mutant lice are probably coming

Health - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 8:50pm









Categories: Health

How disaster technology is saving lives

Health - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 8:46pm
Robots with cameras, microphones and sensors searched for victims stranded in flooded homes and on rooftops. They assessed damage and sent back images from places rescuers couldn't get.








Categories: Health

Trooper stops to help, is shot and killed

CNN - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 8:18pm
A driver who shot a Louisiana state trooper tried to flee the scene, but other motorists wrestled the shotgun from him and detained him with the officer's handcuffs, authorities said.








Categories: National News

Kids' top school anxiety is ...

Health - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 8:08pm









Categories: Health

Is early breast cancer overtreated?

Health - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 8:04pm









Categories: Health

The most-traded stocks during Monday's crazy market selloff

Business News - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 7:20pm
It was a wild day for stocks.








How I made money when the Dow lost 1,000 points

Business News - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 7:14pm
When Ryan Cutter woke up today, he was focused on getting to the gym and gearing up for his first day of business school.








'It's about time!' No more jail for minor offenses in Ferguson

Business News - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 6:59pm
As tensions remain high in the controversy-stricken city of Ferguson, residents now have one less thing to worry about: They will no longer face time behind bars if they can't afford tickets for minor offenses.








Trading was halted 1,200 times Monday

Business News - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 6:38pm
The selling on Wall Street was so dramatic Monday that it triggered unprecedented emergency freezes on stocks.








Startups look to ‘next level’ at MaroonXpo

MSU News - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 6:05pm
Associate professor John Edwards, Social Drizzle cofounder and CEO, presented his social media product Thursday during MaroonXpo, a MSU entrepreneurship program taking place at the Mill at MSU Conference Center. (Photo by Russ Houston)

Contact: Zack Plair

Associate professor John Edwards, Social Drizzle cofounder and CEO, presented his social media product Thursday during MaroonXpo, a MSU entrepreneurship program taking place at the Mill at MSU Conference Center. (Photo by Russ Houston)

STARKVILLE, Miss.—Five technology startups are seeking $750,000 in combined seed money being made available through a Mississippi State-sponsored entrepreneurship program.

Organized by the College of Business’ Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, the recently concluded 10-week MaroonX Accelerator pilot program involved the startup teams—each with at least one Mississippi State student—that had researched and developed product concepts to a point they could be pitched to investors.

During the 2015 MaroonXpo held Thursday [Aug. 20] at the Mill at MSU Conference Center, representatives of ArcFolio, CollegeFit, MState Tech, Social Drizzle and Vibe were looking for either an investment or professional feedback to help take their businesses to the next level.

The international Blackstone Charitable Foundation awarded a joint $200,000 grant to MSU and Texas A&M University to fund the accelerator. The two universities evenly split the grant funds.

Eric Hill said the five teams logged a combined 1,457 work hours and made 166 customer contacts. “We put some really aggressive goals on them all summer long,” the MSU Entrepreneurship Center director added.

Hill said the nearly 20 investors took part either in person or by webcast in the Xpo. He described the group as individuals with annual salaries of more than $200,000 or holders of at least $1 million in worth beyond a primary residence.

ArcFolio was presented by cofounders Jarred Creel of Starkville and Curtis Reed of St. Charles, Mo., both third-year MSU architecture majors. Their online portal for students and entry-level interns in the design field enables the display and management of vast portfolios. The site went live July 31 and prospective employers now may sign up free. Creel and Reed are seeking a $200,000 investment.

CollegeFit was founded by MSU senior computer science major Kelcy Gooch of Ridgeland and Greg Riley of Jackson. They sought feedback for their web-based social platform designed to promote healthy lifestyles, social experiences and academic achievement in one venue. Launched in March, CollegeFit seeks partnerships with student-heavy apartment complexes with fitness facilities. Gooch and Riley will also offer tutoring services on- and off-campus.

MState Tech founder Shane Clark, a physics graduate student from Starkville, made a presentation for Dog Sense, which is designed to protect hunting dogs from being hit with the hunter’s gunfire. The product involves a dog-collar mounted RF beacon that can communicate with a sensor on the gun at a range of up to 500 yards. Clark said his team is planning a soft launch in October and seeks $100,000 to have a hard launch early next year.

Social Drizzle was cofounded by associate research professor John Edwards with MSU’s nationally recognized Social Science Research Center, who presented a hardware-software product now in use at MSU that flows fan tweets—including visual images—onto stadium video boards during sporting events. Also the company’s CEO, Edwards said his business, already in partnership with Twitter, seeks a $350,000 investment.

Vibe was founded by electrical engineering major Hagan Walker of Columbus and art/graphic design major Kaylie Mitchell of Pascagoula, both seniors. Named lumi, their patent-pending product is a water-activated product that adds light and flavor to drinks. Walker and Mitchell are seeking $100,000 to move their product to full-scale manufacturing.

Parker Stewart of St. Augustine, Florida, is a 2013 MSU management and entrepreneurship graduate serving as entrepreneurship program coordinator. He owns the Mississippi-based Del Viejo Gourmet Food Co.

“This event was incredible,” he said. “I’m very proud of the five teams; they’ve come a long way testing their hypotheses and finding out what their customers want.”

Stewart said he also was “excited to be a part of showcasing what Mississippi entrepreneurs can do.”

For more on the MSU Entrepreneur Center, visit www.ecenter.msstate.edu.

MSU is Mississippi’s flagship research university, available online at www.msstate.edu.

Updated Stats: 26 Diamond Dawgs In Professional Baseball

Bulldog Beat - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 6:03pm
STARKVILLE, Miss. – Twenty-six former Mississippi State baseball players are currently in professional baseball, including four currently playing in Major League Baseball. Below are their updated stats following games that ended Sunday, August 23, 2015. Please tweet any corrections to @HailStateBB.

'Fear The Walking Dead' devours cable record

Business News - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 5:57pm
The dead rose again, and in record numbers.








After historic 1,000-point plunge, Dow dives 588 points at close

Business News - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 5:42pm
After an unprecedented 1,000-point decline at the open on Monday, the Dow closed with a loss of nearly 600 points.








I was on the Ashley Madison list. What do I do?

Business News - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 5:33pm
If your information was part of the Ashley Madison hack, your problems are probably bigger than a compromised credit card number.








MSU faculty research featured in Science magazine

MSU News - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 4:58pm
Farshid Vahedifard

Contact: Allison Matthews

Farshid Vahedifard

STARKVILLE, Miss.—A Mississippi State University assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering is the lead author on a letter published last week [Aug. 21] in Science magazine.

Farshid Vahedifard, an MSU Bagley College of Engineering faculty member since 2012, is lead author on the letter titled “Drought threatens California’s levees,” which may be viewed at http://www.sciencemag.org/content/349/6250/799.1.full. Additional authors are Amir AghaKouchak of University of California, Irvine, and MSU civil engineering graduate student Joe D. Robinson of Meridian, Vahedifard’s advisee.

The letter discusses the threats that ongoing extreme drought poses on California’s levee systems and highlights an urgent need to invest in research regarding the vulnerabilities of these systems under extreme climatic events. Earthen levees protect dry land from floods and function as water storage and management systems, the letter states. Vahedifard points to a 2011 report by the California Department of Water Resources which says that over 21,000 kilometers of earthen levees deliver approximately two-thirds of potable water to more than 23 million Californians and protect more than $47 billion worth of homes and businesses from flooding.

However, current drought conditions pose “a great risk to an already endangered levee system,” the authors warn. Drought conditions – and particularly drought ensued by heavy rainfall and flooding – may cause similar catastrophic failures in California’s levee systems as seen in 2008 along river banks of the Murray River at the peak of Australia’s Millennium Drought and in 2003 in the Netherlands’ Wilnis Levee.

Vahedifard, who completed a second master’s degree and his doctoral work in civil engineering at the University of Delaware after completing previous academic work in Iran, said the commentary is important because there is very little information published about the effect of drought on the performance of critical infrastructures. The civil engineer who specializes in geotechnical engineering added that the National Levee Database shows that only around 10 percent of U.S. levees are rated as “acceptable,” with the rest being rated as “minimally acceptable” or “unacceptable,” indicating that the levee has a minor deficiency or the levee cannot serve as a reliable flood protection structure, respectively.

In California, a vast quantity of levee systems are currently rated as “high hazard,” meaning they are in serious danger of failing during an earthquake or flood event. This indicates that the resilience of these levee systems is a major concern without even considering the effects of the ongoing extreme drought, Vahedifard said. Prolonged droughts threaten the stability of levee systems by inducing soil cracking, increased water seepage through soil, soil strength reduction, soil organic carbon decomposition, land subsidence and erosion, he explained.

“When you have a marginal system, then you just need the last straw to create a failure,” Vahedifard said.

He began research related to climate change and its impact on critical infrastructure with his colleague AghaKouchak, a hydrologist, since 2013. They hypothesized that California’s current extreme drought will accelerate the ongoing land subsidence—or sinking. Recently, NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology published a report that shows the Central Valley is undergoing an unprecedented subsidence period of as much as two inches per month in some locations.

“This is exactly what we predicted, that this drought would lead to increased land subsidence,” Vahedifard said. The danger, he explained, is that it increases the risk of water rising over the top of the levees.

“At MSU, I have been working on quantitatively assessing the resilience and vulnerability of critical infrastructure to extreme events under a changing climate. While several large-scale studies have been conducted to evaluate various aspects and implications of climate change, there is a clear gap in the state of our knowledge in terms of characterizing uncertainty in climate trends and incorporating such findings into engineering practice for planning and designing critical infrastructure,” Vahedifard said.

“An improved understanding of the resilience of critical infrastructure under a changing climate indisputably involves many authoritative and complex technical aspects. It also requires close collaboration between decision makers, engineers, and scientists from various fields including climate science, social science, economics and disaster science. Community engagement and public risk education also are key to enhancing the resilience of infrastructure to climate change,” he added.

“The impacts of climate change on infrastructure pose a multi-physics problem involving thermo-hydro-mechanical processes in different scales. Further research can help communities and decision makers toward developing appropriate climate change adaptation and risk management approaches,” he said.

He emphasized that design and monitoring guidelines may need to be modified to ensure resilient infrastructure against extreme events under a changing climate.

MSU is Mississippi’s flagship research university, available online at www.msstate.edu.

Stock market chaos causes issues for investing websites

Business News - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 4:17pm
Investors were in panic-selling mode Monday morning when the Dow plummeted 1,000 points shortly after the opening bell.








Cox Media seeks reporter who's 'less Paula Zahn, more Zoe Barnes'

Business News - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 4:10pm
Zoe Barnes of Netflix's "House of Cards" was a tenacious reporter, so much so that Cox Media's Rare put out a job listing looking for a real life Zoe Barnes.








The stock market drop...by the numbers

Business News - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 4:08pm
Stock markets around the world recorded dramatic declines. It's ugly. But before you panic, let's put this in perspective. This is hardly the worst day ever for stocks. This pullback also comes after six years of stellar stock market gains. CNNMoney breaks down what's going on... and just how bad it is compared to past drops.








Is the Fed trapped now? Rate hike remains elusive

Business News - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 3:59pm
The U.S. Federal Reserve is stuck between a rock and a hard place.








This is not the time to dump your stocks

Business News - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 3:44pm
If you have money in the stock market, relax. Drink your favorite tea or coffee, walk the dog, do yoga, focus on work or the kids again. This is not the moment to dump your stocks.








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